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Dragonfire
by Donita K. Paul

Reviewed by Lori Fox

"Each book builds on the books that came before it, and Paul's storytelling skills grow along with her young protagonist Kale."

Kale and Bardon are now man and wife and enjoying life together as newlyweds. Unfortunately for them, another husband and wife pair have been wreaking havoc on Amara.

It's up to Kale and Bardon to put a stop to the horrors being perpetuated on the land and people of Amara. The most difficult part of the ordeal is letting each other go.

Kale sees herself as wife first, and wizard and Dragon Keeper second. So when her wizardly duties get in the way of her wifely duties, it's up to her husband and parents to help her see that service to Paladin is the most important duty that she can have. Unfortunately, that means leaving her husband to perform his own duties as a knight while she assists her father, also a dragon keeper, to round up as many dragons in Amara as possible.

DragonFire is Donita K. Paul's fourth book in the Dragon Keepers fantasy series. Each book builds on the books that came before it, and her story telling skill grows along with her young protagonist Kale.

In the beginning of the series (DragonSpell 2004) Kale was a newly released village slave who was brought into Paladin's service because she had the rare ability to find dragon eggs. In the second book (DragonQuest 2005) Kale is sent on a rescue mission accompanied by a rather irritating, by the books older student named Bardon, who is also in service to Paladin. In the third book (DragonKnight), Bardon takes over as the lead character. While still an excellent read, Bardon really just doesn't carry a book the way Kale does with her vivacious and slightly rebellious personality.

As Kale was actually quite young in the first book, I had assumed that the series was meant for middle grade or YA readers. Donita also was a bit carried away with naming things in her new world, though the story was strong enough that it was only a minor irritation.

With the second book, Kale began to grow up, but also was just hitting the "rebellious age". It made for very entertaining reading as she verbally sparred with Bardon while having a fascinating, and well developed world to explore.

In the third book, with Bardon in the lead, there was much less entertaining banter throughout the beginning of the book, but some fascinating characters were added throughout the story.

In DragonFire, Kale is reintroduced as the lead character, but separated from Bardon throughout much of the book. The struggles and exploration have become better and more interesting book by book, and if Donita's next book follows this path it should deserve a place on the best seller list.

Lori Fox is a freelance writer who is working on her first novel as well as writing reviews for TitleTrakk.com. In addition to writing, she enjoys reading, making jewelry, and taking as many trips to Walt Disney World as possible with her wonderful husband Kyle. Visit her online at her website.